Tresiba® mechanism of protraction (MOP) video

Learn about the specifically engineered molecular structure of Tresiba®. View the animated video below to see the full MOP.


A mechanism of protraction that results in a slow and consistent rate of absorption into circulation1,2

Tresiba® molecule


Insulin degludec exists as soluble and stable dihexamers in the pen in the presence of zinc and phenol3

Tresiba® molecule chain


After injection, phenol diffuses and degludec dihexamers assemble and form multihexamer chains, resulting in a subcutaneous insulin depot3

Tresiba® absorption


Zinc diffuses and insulin monomers are slowly and continuously absorbed from the depot into circulation3


The mechanism of protraction contributes to the long duration of action


The glucose-lowering effect of Tresiba® lasted at least 42 hours2,4,a

Tresiba® must be dosed at the same time each day for pediatric patients and can be dosed at any time of day for adult patients. Adult patients who miss a dose of Tresiba® should inject their daily dose during waking hours upon discovering the missed dose, then continue with their regular dosing schedule. Ensure that at least 8 hours have elapsed between Tresiba® injections.4 Instruct pediatric patients who miss a dose of Tresiba® to contact their health care provider for guidance and to monitor blood glucose levels more frequently until the next scheduled dose.

aAfter the last of 8 once-daily injections (0.4 units/kg).


Tresiba® MOP

References

  1. Jonassen I, Havelund S, Hoeg-Jensen T, Steensgaard DB, Wahlund PO, Ribel U. Pharm Res. 2012;29(8):2104-2114.
  2. Haahr H, Heise T. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2014;53(9):787-800.
  3. Tresiba [package insert]. Plainsboro, NJ: Novo Nordisk Inc; September 2015.
  4. De Rycke A, Mathieu C. Eur Endocrinol. 2011;7(2):84-87. doi:http://doi.org/10.17925/EE.2011.07.02.84.
  5. Seested T, Havelund S, Jonassen IB, Hoeg-Jensen T, Pyke C, Nishimura E. Diabetes. 2012;61(suppl 1):A250 [abstract 980-P].



Dive deeper into Tresiba®



Give patients with diabetes a glucose-lowering effect of at least 42 hours4,a
Discover the latest professional resources from Tresiba®

Adult patients with diabetes who miss a dose of Tresiba® should inject their daily dose during waking hours upon discovering the missed dose, then continue with their regular dosing schedule. Ensure that at least 8 hours have elapsed between Tresiba® injections.4

aAfter the last of 8 once-daily injections (0.4 units/kg).

Selected Important Safety Information

Contraindications

  • Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients

Warnings and Precautions

  • Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens
  • Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed
  • Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening

Indications and Usage

Tresiba® (insulin degludec injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in patients 1 year of age and older with diabetes mellitus.

Limitations of Use

Tresiba® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis or for pediatric patients requiring less than 5 units of Tresiba®.

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

  • Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients

Warnings and Precautions

  • Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch® Pen Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens
  • Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Changes in insulin may affect glycemic control. These changes should be made cautiously and under medical supervision. Adjustments in concomitant oral anti-diabetic treatment may be needed
  • Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Tresiba®, and may be life-threatening. Increase monitoring with changes to: insulin dose, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness or renal or hepatic impairment
  • Accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. To avoid medication errors, always instruct patients to check the insulin label before each injection
  • Severe, life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur with insulin products, including Tresiba®
  • As with all insulins, Tresiba® use can lead to life-threatening hypokalemia, which then may cause respiratory paralysis, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. Closely monitor potassium levels in patients at risk of hypokalemia and treat if indicated
  • Fluid retention and heart failure can occur with concomitant use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are PPAR-gamma agonists, and insulin, including Tresiba®. Patients should be observed for signs and symptoms of heart failure. If heart failure occurs, dosage reduction or discontinuation of the TZD must be considered

Adverse Reactions

  • Adverse reactions commonly associated with Tresiba® are hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus, rash, edema, and weight gain

Drug Interactions

  • Certain drugs may affect glucose metabolism, requiring insulin dose adjustment and close monitoring of blood glucose. The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may be reduced or absent in patients taking anti-adrenergic drugs (e.g., beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine)

Please click here for Prescribing Information.

 

References:

  1. Heise T, Korsatko S, Nosek L, et al. J Diabetes. 2016;8(1):132-138.
  2. Heise T, Hermanski L, Nosek L, Feldman A, Rasmussen S, Haahr H. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012;14(9):859-864.
  3. Jonassen I, Havelund S, Hoeg-Jensen T, Steensgaard DB, Wahlund PO, Ribel U. Pharm Res. 2012;29(8):2104-2114.
  4. Tresiba [package insert]. Plainsboro, NJ: Novo Nordisk Inc; December 2016.